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Confederate Heritage Month – Minutes 6 – 10

15 Apr

by Calvin Johnson

 
 
 

Day – 6 Confederate Heritage Month Minute The use of men and women in intelligence operations has always been vital to national security. It is important to know what others are doing. 
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Day – 7 Confederate Heritage Month Minute Like the American soldier who is doing his duty, today, in Iraq and around the world, so did the legendary Sam Davis. Sam Davis, born on 1845 in Smyrna, Tennessee, is called the boy Hero of the Confederacy. He served as a private in the 1st Tennessee Infantry under Captain Coleman. Coleman’s scouts gathered information about Union Forces moving from middle Tennessee toward Chattanooga. 
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Day – 8 Confederate Heritage Month Minute Confederate Brigadier General Augustus Kirk Zollicoffer of Kentucky (1812-1862) was a descendant of a family from Altinklingen in Switzerland (Castle Maerstetten in Kanton Thargau.) General Zollicoffer was killed at the Battle of Mill Springs in 1862 during the War Between the States. 
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Day – 9 Confederate Heritage Month Minute Kate Cumming was a remarkable woman. Born in Edinburgh, England, in 1835, her family first made their move to Montreal Canada. They would move next to Mobile, Alabama, where Kate,as young woman, quickly adopted to the Southern way of life. It has been written that Cumming was intelligent and courageous in all she did. Kate did not support secession, but, when the South was invaded, she was quick to criticize the actions of Union President Abraham Lincoln. She became a strong supporter of the Confederate cause and looked down at those Southerners who were less patriotic. She believed that every able bodied man and woman should do whatever they could for the South. 
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Day – 10 Confederate Heritage Month Minute Captain Henry Wirz was born, Hartman Heinrich Wirz in November 1823, in Zurich, Switzerland where his father, Abraham Wirz was highly respected. 
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Updates

Cassville SCV Memorial – April 17 The Cassville SCV Memorial service in April 17th at 10:00 am Speaker will be Tray Gaines. Directions I-75, exit 295, Cassville-White Road, located about 7 miles north of Cartersville off US Highway 41 to Cassville Road.  
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Newnan & Coweta County – April 17The Sons of Confederate Veteran Camps of Newnan and Coweta County would like to invite the public to a Confederate Memorial Service Saturday, April 17th at 10 A.M. in the Confederate section of Oak Hill Cemetery on Bullsboro Drive in Newnan.  
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Day – 14 Confederate Heritage Month Minute On August 10 , 1905, Amos Rucker, a ex-Confederate soldier and proud member of the United Confederate Veterans, died in Atlanta, Georgia. His friends of the UCV had previously bought a grave site and marker for he and his wife Martha who had limited income. Amos Rucker was one of many thousands of Black Southerners who fought for the South during the War Between the States. 
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Kennesaw Chapter No. 241 UDC – April 25 The Kenn esaw Chapter No. 241 United Daughters of the Confederacy invite all to participate in their Annual Confederate Memorial Day Service to take place on Sunday, April 25, starting a 2 PM at the Confederate Cemetery in Marietta, Georgia. 
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Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp # 938 – April 17 The Lt. Col. William Luffman Camp # 938 will be holding our annual Confederate Memorial Day Service at New Prospect Bapt ist Church Cemetery this coming Saturday, April 17, at 10:00 a.m. Our speaker will be Martha Locke, past Georgia Division President of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 
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http://ConfederateHeritageMonth.com

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Posted by on April 15, 2010 in Georgia, South, States Rights, True History

 

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